Tom's of Maine Activated Charcoal Peppermint Fluoride Free

Tom’S Of Maine Activated Charcoal Peppermint Fluoride Free

Danger 15
Danger: 15

Safe for most peoples.
Medium choice.

Analyze ingredients for more information

Ingredients:


Composition analysis


The main carrier for all ingredients.
Helps dissolve other soluble ingredients. Helps the mechanical process of cleaning teeth in mouthwashes.

Benzyl alcohol is an aromatic alcohol with the formula C6H5CH2OH
Benzyl alcohol is used as a general solvent for inks, waxes, shellacs, paints, lacquers, and epoxy resin coatings. Thus it can be used in paint strippers, especially when combined with compatible viscosity enhancers to encourage the mixture to cling to painted surfaces.
Danger:
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It oxidizes rapidly in healthy individuals to benzoic acid, conjugated with glycine in the liver, and excreted as hippuric acid. Very high concentrations can result in toxic effects including respiratory failure, vasodilation, hypotension, convulsions, and paralysis. Benzyl alcohol is toxic to neonates and is associated with the gasping syndrome. Benzyl alcohol is severely toxic and highly irritating to the eye.Pure benzyl alcohol produces corneal necrosis. Benzyl alcohol is not considered to be a carcinogen, and no data are available regarding teratogenic or reproductive effects.


A lightweight black carbon residue produced by strongly heating wood,animal or plant materials)
Charcoal is a lightweight black carbon residue produced by strongly heating wood (or other animal and plant materials) so as to drive off all water and other volatile constituents. In the traditional version of this pyrolysis process, called charcoal burning, the heat is supplied by burning part of the starting material itself, with a limited supply of oxygen. Charcoal can also be produced by heating the material in a closed retort. This process also happens while burning wood, as in a fireplace or wood stove. The visible flame in that case is actually due to combustion of the volatiles given off as the wood turns into charcoal. The soot and smoke commonly given off by wood fire result from incomplete combustion of those volatiles. Charcoal itself burns at a higher temperature than wood, with hardly a visible flame, and gives off practically no smoke, soot, or unburnt volatiles. Charcoal is currently one of the biggest trends in the world of wellness and cosmetics. It’s become a trendy ingredient in commercial face masks and scrubs, and some people also swear by it for whitening their teeth. Activated charcoal — the type used in beauty products and toothpaste — is a fine grain powder made from wood, coconut shells, and other natural substances that are oxidized under extreme heat.
Danger:
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  1. Charcoal toothpaste is too abrasive for everyday use. Using a material that’s too abrasive on your teeth can wear down your enamel. This may make your teeth look more yellow by exposing the dentin, a calcified yellow tissue. It can also make your teeth more sensitive.
  2. It may cause staining on some teeth. Charcoal particles could accumulate in the cracks and crevices of older teeth.
  3. Charcoal’s effect on dental restorations isn’t known. It’s not yet known how charcoal affects the materials used to make veneers, bridges, crowns, and white fillings. Particles of charcoal could build up between them, leaving a black or gray outline.

Helps prevent products from drying out, acts as a thickener and provides sweetness.
Glycerol (also called glycerine or glycerin) is a simple polyol compound. Glycerin is mildly antimicrobial and antiviral and is an FDA approved treatment for wounds. The Red Cross reports that an 85% solution of glycerin shows bactericidal and antiviral effects, and wounds treated with glycerin show reduced inflammation after roughly 2 hours. Due to this it is used widely in wound care products, including glycerin based hydrogel sheets for burns and other wound care. It is approved for all types of wound care except third degree burns, and is used to package donor skin used in skin grafts. There is no topical treatment approved for third degree burns, and so this limitation is not exclusive to glycerin. Glycerol is used in medical, pharmaceutical and personal care preparations, often as a means of improving smoothness, providing lubrication, and as a humectant. In toothpastes Glycerol holds onto water and prevents the toothpaste from drying out in the tube, and also prevents dryness in the mouth during brushing. It can help reduce bacterial activity by reducing the available water activity and therefore has a protective action against tooth decay. Glycerin does not damage gums or tooth enamel.
Danger:
Glycerin as ingredient of foods,cosmetic products ,toothpaste and ...may cause : Upset stomach, Stomach cramps, Gas, Diarrhea, Burning, Rectal irritation. Glycerin does not damage gums or tooth enamel.

Danger:
Hydrated silica is listed by the US Food and Drug Administration as "Generally Recognized as Safe", however one drawback of  abrasives in toothpaste is that they may make some people's teeth sensitive, especially if they brush very hard and do not brush with a soft-bristled toothbrush. The dentin and the pulp that lie beneath the enamel are sensitive, says the  American Dental Association (ADA), so that why it's key to have a strong enamel.



Danger:
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Rebaudioside A has generally recognized as safe (GRAS) status in the U.S. for use as a sweetener for foods. Stevioside has been safely used in research in doses of up to 1500 mg daily for 2 years. Some people who take stevia or stevioside can experience bloating or nausea.


Danger:
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Ingesting large amounts of sorbitol can lead to abdominal pain, flatulence, and mild to severe diarrhea. Habitual sorbitol consumption of over 20 grams (0.7 oz) per day as sugar-free gum has led to severe diarrhea, causing unintended weight loss or even requiring hospitalization. In early studies, a dose of 25g of sorbitol, eaten through the day, produced a laxative effect in only 5% of individuals. As a result of the large molecular weight of sorbitol, when large amounts of sorbitol are ingested, only a small amount of sorbitol is absorbed in the small intestine, and most of the sorbitol enters the colon, with consequent gastrointestinal effects.

Danger:
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For most people, eating foods that contain xanthan gum appears to be completely safe. While many foods contain it, it only makes up about 0.05–0.3% of a food product. Moreover, a typical person consumes less than 1 gram of xanthan gum per day. Amounts 20 times that have been proven to be safe. In fact, the Joint Expert Committee on Food Additives assigned it an acceptable daily intake of “not specified.” It gives this designation when food additives have a very low toxicity, and levels in foods are so small that they do not pose a health hazard. But people should avoid inhaling xanthan gum. Workers who handled it in powder form were found to have flu-like symptoms and nose and throat irritation. So even though you may eat many foods containing it, your intake is so small that you’re unlikely to experience either benefits or negative side effects.

Danger:
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Xylitol is generally well tolerated, but some people experience digestive side effects when they consume too much. The sugar alcohols can pull water into your intestine or get fermented by gut bacteria. This can lead to gas, bloating and diarrhea.

Gently whiten teeth the natural way with our new Activated Charcoal Toothpaste. Formulated without fluoride, this whitening toothpaste removes surface stains to help restore your teeth to their natural color. Best of all, it’s been specially crafted for everyday use to be safe and gentle on your enamel, based on RDA testing.

  • Gently whitens teeth
  • No fluoride
  • Natural toothpaste that’s safe for enamel and everyday use
  • SLS-free
  • No artificial flavors, colors, or preservatives
  • No animal ingredients
  • Not tested on animals

Directions

Brush thoroughly, preferably after each meal but at least twice a day, or as directed by a dentist or physician.

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