Crest Gum Detoxify Charcoal

Crest Gum Detoxify Charcoal

12+
Danger 32
Danger: 32

Not very good.
Not recommended

Analyze ingredients for more information

Ingredients:


Composition analysis


The main carrier for all ingredients.
Helps dissolve other soluble ingredients. Helps the mechanical process of cleaning teeth in mouthwashes.


A lightweight black carbon residue produced by strongly heating wood,animal or plant materials)
Charcoal is a lightweight black carbon residue produced by strongly heating wood (or other animal and plant materials) so as to drive off all water and other volatile constituents. In the traditional version of this pyrolysis process, called charcoal burning, the heat is supplied by burning part of the starting material itself, with a limited supply of oxygen. Charcoal can also be produced by heating the material in a closed retort. This process also happens while burning wood, as in a fireplace or wood stove. The visible flame in that case is actually due to combustion of the volatiles given off as the wood turns into charcoal. The soot and smoke commonly given off by wood fire result from incomplete combustion of those volatiles. Charcoal itself burns at a higher temperature than wood, with hardly a visible flame, and gives off practically no smoke, soot, or unburnt volatiles. Charcoal is currently one of the biggest trends in the world of wellness and cosmetics. It’s become a trendy ingredient in commercial face masks and scrubs, and some people also swear by it for whitening their teeth. Activated charcoal — the type used in beauty products and toothpaste — is a fine grain powder made from wood, coconut shells, and other natural substances that are oxidized under extreme heat.
Danger:
⚠⚠⚠
  1. Charcoal toothpaste is too abrasive for everyday use. Using a material that’s too abrasive on your teeth can wear down your enamel. This may make your teeth look more yellow by exposing the dentin, a calcified yellow tissue. It can also make your teeth more sensitive.
  2. It may cause staining on some teeth. Charcoal particles could accumulate in the cracks and crevices of older teeth.
  3. Charcoal’s effect on dental restorations isn’t known. It’s not yet known how charcoal affects the materials used to make veneers, bridges, crowns, and white fillings. Particles of charcoal could build up between them, leaving a black or gray outline.


Helps prevent tooth decay
Fluoride-containing compounds, such as sodium fluoride or sodium monofluorophosphate are used in topical and systemic fluoride therapy for preventing tooth decay. They are used for water fluoridation and in many products associated with oral hygiene. Originally, sodium fluoride was used to fluoridate water; hexafluorosilicic acid (H2SiF6) and its salt sodium hexafluorosilicate (Na2SiF6) are more commonly used additives, especially in the United States. The fluoridation of water is known to prevent tooth decayand is considered by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as "one of 10 great public health achievements of the 20th century". In some countries where large, centralized water systems are uncommon, fluoride is delivered to the populace by fluoridating table salt. For the method of action for cavity prevention, see Fluoride therapy. Fluoridation of water has its critics (see Water fluoridation controversy).
Danger:
⚠⚠⚠
Fluoride toxicity is a condition in which there are elevated levels of the fluoride ion in the body. Although fluoride is safe for dental health at low concentrations, sustained consumption of large amounts of soluble fluoride salts is dangerous. Referring to a common salt of fluoride, sodium fluoride (NaF), the lethal dose for most adult humans is estimated at 5 to 10 g (which is equivalent to 32 to 64 mg elemental fluoride/kg body weight). Ingestion of fluoride can produce gastrointestinal discomfort at doses at least 15 to 20 times lower (0.2–0.3 mg/kg or 10 to 15 mg for a 50 kg person) than lethal doses.[4] Although it is helpful topically for dental health in low dosage, chronic ingestion of fluoride in large amounts interferes with bone formation. In this way, the most widespread examples of fluoride poisoning arise from consumption of ground water that is abnormally fluoride-rich.

Danger:
Hydrated silica is listed by the US Food and Drug Administration as "Generally Recognized as Safe", however one drawback of  abrasives in toothpaste is that they may make some people's teeth sensitive, especially if they brush very hard and do not brush with a soft-bristled toothbrush. The dentin and the pulp that lie beneath the enamel are sensitive, says the  American Dental Association (ADA), so that why it's key to have a strong enamel.

Danger:
⚠⚠
Serious side effects of sodium citrate include numbness or tingly feeling, swelling or rapid weight gain, muscle twitching or cramps, fast or slow heart rate, confusion, or mood changes, bloody or tarry stools, severe stomach pain, ongoing diarrhea, or seizure (convulsions).

Danger:
⚠⚠
Whole Foods has deemed the ingredient acceptable in its body care and cleaning product quality standards. The National Institutes of Health report that the ingredient is not a skin or eye irritant, and the FDA has deemed it Generally Recognized as Safe.

Danger:
⚠⚠⚠⚠⚠
Contact causes severe burns with redness, swelling, pain and blurred vision. Permanent damage including blindness can result. Ingestion: Can burn the lips, tongue, throat and stomach. Symptoms may include nausea, vomiting, stomach cramps and diarrhea.

Danger:
⚠⚠⚠
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regards SLS as safe as a food additive. Regarding its use in cosmetics and body products, the safety assessment study of SLS, published in 1983 in the International Journal of Toxicology (the most recent assessment), found that it’s not harmful if used briefly and rinsed from the skin, as with shampoos and soaps. The report says that products that stay on the skin longer shouldn’t exceed 1 percent concentration of SLS. However, the same assessment did suggest some possible, albeit minimal, risk to humans using SLS. For example, some tests found that continuous skin exposure to SLS could cause mild to moderate irritation in animals. Nevertheless, the assessment concluded that SLS is safe in formulations used in cosmetics and personal care products. Because many of these products are designed to be rinsed off after short applications, the risks are minimal. According to most research, SLS is an irritant but not a carcinogen. Studies have shown no link between the use of SLS and increased cancer risk. According to a 2015 study, SLS is safe for use in household cleaning products.

Danger:
⚠⚠⚠⚠
In the 1970s, studies performed on laboratory rats found an association between consumption of high doses of saccharin and the development of bladder cancer. However, further study determined that this effect was due to a mechanism that is not relevant to humans.Epidemiological studies have shown no evidence that saccharin is associated with bladder cancer in humans.The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) originally classified saccharin in Group 2B ("possibly carcinogenic to humans") based on the rat studies, but downgraded it to Group 3 ("not classifiable as to the carcinogenicity to humans") upon review of the subsequent research. Saccharin has no food energy and no nutritional value. It is safe to consume for individuals with diabetes. People with sulfonamide allergies can experience allergic reactions to saccharin, as it is a sulfonamide derivative and can cross-react. Saccharin in toothpaste can cause burning sensations, swelling, and rashes of the mouth and lips in sensitive individuals.

Danger:
⚠⚠⚠
Ingesting large amounts of sorbitol can lead to abdominal pain, flatulence, and mild to severe diarrhea. Habitual sorbitol consumption of over 20 grams (0.7 oz) per day as sugar-free gum has led to severe diarrhea, causing unintended weight loss or even requiring hospitalization. In early studies, a dose of 25g of sorbitol, eaten through the day, produced a laxative effect in only 5% of individuals. As a result of the large molecular weight of sorbitol, when large amounts of sorbitol are ingested, only a small amount of sorbitol is absorbed in the small intestine, and most of the sorbitol enters the colon, with consequent gastrointestinal effects.

Danger:
⚠⚠⚠⚠
Stannous Chloride can cause headache, nausea, vomiting and fatigue.

Danger:
⚠⚠
Some of the most commonly reported adverse effects include: Gastrointestinal problems. Seizures, dizziness, and migraines. Blurred vision. Allergic reactions. Blood sugar increases and weight gain.

Danger:
⚠⚠
For most people, eating foods that contain xanthan gum appears to be completely safe. While many foods contain it, it only makes up about 0.05–0.3% of a food product. Moreover, a typical person consumes less than 1 gram of xanthan gum per day. Amounts 20 times that have been proven to be safe. In fact, the Joint Expert Committee on Food Additives assigned it an acceptable daily intake of “not specified.” It gives this designation when food additives have a very low toxicity, and levels in foods are so small that they do not pose a health hazard. But people should avoid inhaling xanthan gum. Workers who handled it in powder form were found to have flu-like symptoms and nose and throat irritation. So even though you may eat many foods containing it, your intake is so small that you’re unlikely to experience either benefits or negative side effects.

Danger:
⚠⚠
When used as directed, zinc supplements can be a safe and effective way to increase your zinc intake and improve several aspects of your health. However, they have been associated with adverse side effects, including nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and stomach pain Exceeding 40 mg per day of elemental zinc can cause flu-like symptoms, such as fever, coughing, headache, and fatigue . Zinc can also interfere with your body’s ability to absorb copper, potentially leading to a deficiency in this key mineral over time. Furthermore, zinc supplements have been shown to interfere with the absorption of certain antibiotics, reducing their effectiveness if taken at the same time. To reduce your risk of side effects, stick to the recommended dosage and avoid exceeding the tolerable upper limit of 40 mg per day — unless under medical supervision. If you experience any negative side effects after taking zinc supplements, decrease your dosage and consider consulting with your healthcare professional if symptoms persist.

There are millions of harmful plaque bacteria that can lurk around the gum line causing gingivitis. Crest Pro-Health Gum Detoxify Charcoal Toothpaste has an activated foam formula with charcoal that penetrates hard to reach places to neutralize harmful plaque bacteria even around the gum line, for clinically proven healthier gums. It is also formulated to cool gums during and after brushing for a refreshing clean. Because if you’re not taking care of your gums, you’re not really taking care of your mouth.

  • Healthier gums and brighter teeth with charcoal
  • The formula with charcoal brightens teeth by removing surface stains
  • Includes 7 key benefits: Cavities, Gingivitis, Plaque, Sensitivity, Tartar, Whitening, Freshens Breath

Directions

Adults and children 12 yrs. of age and older: Brush teeth thoroughly, preferably after each meal or at least twice a day, or as directed by dentist or physician. Do not swallow. Children under 12 yrs. of age: ask a dentist.

Other Toothpastes:

0
Rated 0 out of 5
0 out of 5 stars (based on 0 reviews)
Excellent0%
Very good0%
Average0%
Poor0%
Terrible0%

Reviews for Crest Gum Detoxify Charcoal

There are no reviews yet. Be the first one to write one.

Submit your review