Arm And Hammer Essentials Fluoride-Free Toothpaste Whiten + Activated Charcoal

Arm And Hammer Essentials Fluoride-Free Toothpaste Whiten + Activated Charcoal

2+
Danger 14
Danger: 14

Safe.
Good choice

Analyze ingredients for more information

Ingredients:


Composition analysis



A lightweight black carbon residue produced by strongly heating wood,animal or plant materials)
Charcoal is a lightweight black carbon residue produced by strongly heating wood (or other animal and plant materials) so as to drive off all water and other volatile constituents. In the traditional version of this pyrolysis process, called charcoal burning, the heat is supplied by burning part of the starting material itself, with a limited supply of oxygen. Charcoal can also be produced by heating the material in a closed retort. This process also happens while burning wood, as in a fireplace or wood stove. The visible flame in that case is actually due to combustion of the volatiles given off as the wood turns into charcoal. The soot and smoke commonly given off by wood fire result from incomplete combustion of those volatiles. Charcoal itself burns at a higher temperature than wood, with hardly a visible flame, and gives off practically no smoke, soot, or unburnt volatiles. Charcoal is currently one of the biggest trends in the world of wellness and cosmetics. It’s become a trendy ingredient in commercial face masks and scrubs, and some people also swear by it for whitening their teeth. Activated charcoal — the type used in beauty products and toothpaste — is a fine grain powder made from wood, coconut shells, and other natural substances that are oxidized under extreme heat.
Danger:
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  1. Charcoal toothpaste is too abrasive for everyday use. Using a material that’s too abrasive on your teeth can wear down your enamel. This may make your teeth look more yellow by exposing the dentin, a calcified yellow tissue. It can also make your teeth more sensitive.
  2. It may cause staining on some teeth. Charcoal particles could accumulate in the cracks and crevices of older teeth.
  3. Charcoal’s effect on dental restorations isn’t known. It’s not yet known how charcoal affects the materials used to make veneers, bridges, crowns, and white fillings. Particles of charcoal could build up between them, leaving a black or gray outline.


Helps prevent products from drying out, acts as a thickener and provides sweetness.
Glycerol (also called glycerine or glycerin) is a simple polyol compound. Glycerin is mildly antimicrobial and antiviral and is an FDA approved treatment for wounds. The Red Cross reports that an 85% solution of glycerin shows bactericidal and antiviral effects, and wounds treated with glycerin show reduced inflammation after roughly 2 hours. Due to this it is used widely in wound care products, including glycerin based hydrogel sheets for burns and other wound care. It is approved for all types of wound care except third degree burns, and is used to package donor skin used in skin grafts. There is no topical treatment approved for third degree burns, and so this limitation is not exclusive to glycerin. Glycerol is used in medical, pharmaceutical and personal care preparations, often as a means of improving smoothness, providing lubrication, and as a humectant. In toothpastes Glycerol holds onto water and prevents the toothpaste from drying out in the tube, and also prevents dryness in the mouth during brushing. It can help reduce bacterial activity by reducing the available water activity and therefore has a protective action against tooth decay. Glycerin does not damage gums or tooth enamel.
Danger:
Glycerin as ingredient of foods,cosmetic products ,toothpaste and ...may cause : Upset stomach, Stomach cramps, Gas, Diarrhea, Burning, Rectal irritation. Glycerin does not damage gums or tooth enamel.

Danger:
Hydrated silica is listed by the US Food and Drug Administration as "Generally Recognized as Safe", however one drawback of  abrasives in toothpaste is that they may make some people's teeth sensitive, especially if they brush very hard and do not brush with a soft-bristled toothbrush. The dentin and the pulp that lie beneath the enamel are sensitive, says the  American Dental Association (ADA), so that why it's key to have a strong enamel.

Danger:
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The Cosmetics Database found PEG 8 Laurate to be a moderate to high hazard, in part because of its inclusion of Lauric Acid. It notes the organ toxicity and contamination concerns associated with all PEGs, and also allergies and immunotoxicity concerns associated with its rating of Lauric Acid. According to a study published in the International Journal of Toxicology, PEGs (including PEG 8 Laurate) can contain harmful impurities, including: Ethylene Oxide, known to increase the incidences of uterine and breast cancers and of leukemia and brain cancer, according to experimental results reported by the National Toxicology Program; 1,4-dioxane, a known carcinogen; PAHs, known to increase the risk of breast cancer; lead; iron; and arsenic (Source). Products and formulas containing PEGs should not be used on broken or irritated skin. Although PEGs are considered safe for use topically on healthy skin, studies showed that patients suffering from severe burns were treated with PEG-based antimicrobial cream; this treatment resulted in kidney toxicity. "The PEG content of the antimicrobial cream was determined to be the causative agent. However, no evidence of systemic toxicity occurred in studies with intact skin. Because of the observation of kidney effects in burn patients, the CIR Expert Panel qualified their conclusion on the safety of the PEG ingredients to state that cosmetic formulations containing these ingredients should not be used on damaged skin" (CosmeticsInfo.org).



Danger:
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Common side effects of sodium_bicarbonate include: Aggravated congestive heart failure (CHF) Cerebral hemorrhage Swelling (edema) High blood sodium levels Low blood calcium levels Low blood potassium levels Muscle spasms (associated with low calcium levels) Metabolic alkalosis Belching Bloating Excess fluid in the lungs (pulmonary edema) Hyperosmolality Intracranial acidosis Milk-alkali syndrome


Danger:
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The Cosmetics Database only notes data gaps and no negative side effects or warnings regarding the use of Sodium Methyl Cocoyl Taurate in cosmetics or personal care products. No definitive studies or warnings could be found elsewhere, although Health-Report.co.uk and another site both listed it as a synthetic toxin, with no explanation as to its toxic properties.

Danger:
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For most people, eating foods that contain xanthan gum appears to be completely safe. While many foods contain it, it only makes up about 0.05–0.3% of a food product. Moreover, a typical person consumes less than 1 gram of xanthan gum per day. Amounts 20 times that have been proven to be safe. In fact, the Joint Expert Committee on Food Additives assigned it an acceptable daily intake of “not specified.” It gives this designation when food additives have a very low toxicity, and levels in foods are so small that they do not pose a health hazard. But people should avoid inhaling xanthan gum. Workers who handled it in powder form were found to have flu-like symptoms and nose and throat irritation. So even though you may eat many foods containing it, your intake is so small that you’re unlikely to experience either benefits or negative side effects.

Free of the following ingredients, so you can get outstanding whitening and plaque removal without compromises
Artificial sweeteners and dyes
Sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS)
Preservatives, parabens & peroxide
Fluoride
Made with more of the essential ingredients you need for a healthy, beautiful smile
100% natural baking soda to gently remove surface stains and whiten teeth
Naturally-sourced calcium
Essential oils – sourced from natural North American peppermint – to freshen breath
Clinically proven to whiten teeth and restore shine to your smile

Directions

Adults and children 2 years of age and older: brush teeth thoroughly, preferably after each meal or at least twice a day, or as directed by a dentist or physician. Children 2 to 6 years: Use only a pea sized amount and supervise child's brushing and rinsing (to minimize swallowing). Children under 2 years: ask a dentist of physician.

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